Jury Administration

Every week thousands of prospective jurors assemble in hundreds of courthouses throughout the nation to participate in a civic duty and a right guaranteed by the sixth Amendment to the constitution – the provision of trial by a jury of peers. By serving on a jury, you have a direct hand in the administration of justice.

The law and court procedures of our state had as their origin the Common Law of England where the right to trial by jury existed since 1215. This right has been sacredly guarded and preserved by the institutions of our various states and by the Federal Constitution.

 

The jury is responsible for the correct determination of the facts which are in dispute in a given case. Errors of law may be corrected by the trial judge or appellate courts, but a jury’s error of fact may never be corrected. Thus, a juror’s duty is one of grave responsibility and importance.

Putnam County Jurors are paid at a rate of $25 for each day they serve. The Clerk's Office will also provide each juror with a certificate of service at the conclusion of their service. This certificate will list the day(s) the juror served and may be provided to the juror's employer when necessary. 

You have Jury Duty? Watch the Video Below!

Filling Out a Form
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Juror Instructions

  • Bring your summons with you.

  • Please plan to arrive at the Courthouse by the time stated on the jury information line.

  • Please enter the building through the Marion Street entrance so that you can pass through security. This is the only public entrance to the Putnam County Courthouse.  Note: The only exception will be for those handicapped individuals needing the wheelchair ramp or handicapped parking on the Sumter Street side.

  • By order of the Putnam County Sheriff’s Department, items such as penknives, flashlights, scissors, sewing needles, and any type of weapon are strictly prohibited and are not to be brought into the building.

  • Cellular phones and pagers are allowed; however, they must be turned off and not used in the courtrooms.

  • Chewing gum, food and drinks are not allowed in the courtroom.

  • Proper Dress is required. Shorts, Bermudas, jeans with holes, muscle shirts, halter-tops, and bare midriff clothing are not acceptable Court attire. Please show the proper respect for the Court and dress appropriately.  A light sweater or jacket is recommended as the courtroom temperature can be quite cool.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

  • HOW AM I SELECTED FOR JURY DUTY?

    • You are selected from a list of registered voters and/or those that hold a state issued identification card (which includes licensed drivers).  Jurors are selected on a random basis. You cannot serve on a jury in Putnam County if you are not a current resident of Putnam County or you have been convicted of a felony (in any state or county) and not had your rights restored.

  • HOW LONG DO I HAVE TO SERVE?

    • Most trials last two or three days; however, some trials may take longer. The trial day usually ends between 5:00 and 6:00 p.m. but on rare occasions could go later. If so, you may request to call your family to notify them. You are seldom asked to serve on more than one trial in a week, unless we have a particularly busy week. Normally, your service is only for one week (Monday through Friday) at the most.

    • You are always given an opportunity to let the Court know about any appointments, family obligations, and other concerns you may have during the week. In the rare event that your trial is expected to last longer than one week, you will be notified so that you can let the Court know about appointments during the time period in question.

  • DO I GET PAID FOR MY SERVICE?

    • In Putnam County, you are paid $25.00 for each day of service. You will be given a single check at the end of your service.

    • A jury certificate will be enclosed with your check for your employer.

    • If you are dismissed by telephone after appearing, you will automatically be sent a certificate along with your check.

  • WHERE DO I PARK?

    • Anywhere around the courthouse, but the only public entrance to the Courthouse is the Marion Street entrance on the north side of the Courthouse. The Sumter Street entrance is for handicapped individuals only. Handicapped parking is located on the Sumter Street side as well.

  • IS CHILDCARE OR ELDER CARE PROVIDED?

    • No child or elder care is provided. However, you may call ahead and request to be excused if you normally stay with a child under six years of age or younger during the day, or if you home-school your children. (This does not include professional day care workers.) If you have other care concerns, you may mention them at the appropriate time during jury orientation in the courtroom.

  • IF I HAVE A LEGITIMATE REASON WHY I CANNOT SERVE ON MY ASSIGNED DAY FOR JURY DUTY OR IF I HAVE A HEALTH ISSUE, WHAT SHOULD I DO?

    • You may call the office of the Superior Court Clerk at (706) 485-4501 and request a one-time “carry-over” (deferral) to a later date. (or you can print from the top of this page). You will also be given an opportunity to let us know about any problems and urgent appointments you may have during the orientation on your first day of service. If you are ill, you may call and request a medical exemption affidavit to provide for your doctor’s completion.

  • EXACTLY WHAT ARE THE LEGAL EXCUSES FROM JURY SERVICE?

    • Over 70 years of Age. For Putnam County residents that are over the age of 70, jury service is optional.

    • Full time student. You may be excused if you are carrying 12 or more academic units (hours) during the day and your school is in session during the jury week.

    • Child Six or Under. You may be excused if you normally stay home during the day to care for a child who is six years of age or younger.  Day care workers are not included.)

    • Written Doctor’s Excuse. You may be excused if you have a medical exemption.

    • Active Military Duty. You may be excused if you are currently on active military duty.

    • What if none of these apply to me? You will be given an opportunity during the orientation process to state any other appointments or concerns you may have about your jury service.

  • WHAT INFORMATION ABOUT ME WILL BE GIVEN TO THE LITIGANTS WHO ARE PICKING THE JURY?

    • When jury selection begins, the litigants are told your name, your occupation, your marital status, your spouse’s occupation, and the area where you live. At jury selection, additional questions are asked to determine if you can be fair to both sides if you are selected to serve on the jury.

  • WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A GRAND JUROR AND A TRAVERSE (TRIAL) JUROR?

    • A Grand Juror sits for a six-month term as a part of the Grand Jury, which is made up of 23 people. A member of the Grand Jury determines whether there is probable cause to charge someone with a crime. This is usually a one or two day service during the six-month term.

    • A traverse (trial) juror sits, listens to evidence in a courtroom and determines the facts in a particular case. A traverse juror usually serves for a week or less.